FAQs

What is the difference between copyediting and proofreading?

Can I get an estimate?

How much does it cost? How am I billed?

How quickly can you respond to an editing request?

How do you prefer to receive a project: email or mail?

How do I get in touch and work with you?

How do you work?

How will I receive a project when completed?

Do you read a project a second time to make sure all corrections were made as suggested?

How do you proofread for court reporters?


What is the difference between copyediting and proofreading?

Copyediting is working at the micro and macro level, where text is viewed word-by-word and line-by-line for clarity and consistency, as well as analyzing the whole to see where problems might exist. Sentences should say what they need to say and only that. Too many words or repetition of what has already been said is redundant and could be confusing, as well as boring. A good editor can smooth the flow of words so copy is understandable and engages the reader—artfully but invisibly.

Proofreading is the mechanical, correcting stage and encompasses just about everything else: typos, grammatical errors, syntax, subject-verb agreement, correct punctuation, incorrect spelling, rendering of numbers, and where facts are checked.


Can I get an estimate?

It’s almost impossible to give an accurate estimate of a project until I see a sample of the work because there are so many variables involved: how well written is the project; are there science or technology terms; are there more than the industry-standard 300 words per page; is the text in Times New Roman 12 point font or a smaller, difficult to read font; is the page double spaced; are there extensive footnotes and a bibliography; or a cookbook where each ingredient has to be verified?

Whereas some text might require only light editing and I could read eight to ten or more pages an hour, others might require heavy editing or have technical-laden terms and I would only be able to process two to three pages an hour.


How much does it cost? How am I billed?

You provide a sample, I give you an estimate, and we come to an agreement on a fee and start and delivery dates. If after receipt of the entire project it looks like editing will take longer than the original sample indicated, I will contact you and we can discuss how to proceed. I strive to always provide excellent customer service.

My fee is $30 an hour, and I bill a minimum of one hour for any project. You may send me several short pieces as one project if you wish. When a project is completed, I email the copyedited and/or proofread material to the client, with an invoice for my services. You can accept my editing or not, but you are expected to pay the invoice. If a project is on-going, you will receive periodic invoices on a predetermined schedule.


How quickly can you respond to an editing request?

I work on a first-come, first-served basis. That said, I try to accommodate all requests. If you have a later deadline, I might work on another project before yours, as long as both can be delivered as scheduled. As you may have guessed, many variables determine turnaround time just as they do in preparing an estimate (see above question regarding estimates). If you have a rush project, so indicate on the Contact Us form. I keep my schedule somewhat flexible for emergencies.


How do you prefer to receive a project: email or mail?

The world being electronic now, there is usually not enough time to send a project through the mail. I prefer email, for the client’s sake as well as mine. I usually receive projects electronically in a Word document.

If the project involves copyediting and proofreading a website, there are two options: email me all the printed pages or email me the URL for every single web page to be edited. With most websites being dense and complicated, there is a real possibility that a page could be overlooked.


How do I get in touch and work with you?

There is a Contact Us page on our website that contains a form you can use to email me.

As explained on our Terms & Conditions page, prior to the commencement of a project, you and I will have agreed to the terms of the project. Once we’ve reached an understanding, I will email you a Booking Confirmation form for your signature. Once signed, you can scan and return it to me by email, along with the project, if that is the timetable agreed upon.


How do you work?

I process every project this way:


  • I edit on paper twice—the first time for mechanical errors (grammar, spellings, etc.);

  • I edit a second time to analyze for overall content and tone;

  • I then transfer all edits and comments electronically, thus giving me a third opportunity with the material.


How will I receive a project when completed?

After marking corrections on paper, I proceed one of three ways:


  • If the job is in Word, I can make changes electronically using Track Changes;

  • If desired, I can scan marked-up pages and attach the scan to an email;

  • If there are minimal corrections or the project is brief, I can contact you to go over the details.


Do you read a project a second time to make sure all corrections were made as suggested?

Yes, I do, if desired. As mentioned above, if you receive the finished project in Word with Track Changes, it’s simply a matter of accepting or rejecting each of my suggested changes and addressing the comments. But if edited copy was scanned and emailed, I can compare your corrected version to my marked-up copy to make sure nothing was missed. Reading your corrected version is billed per hour or is negotiated in the original Agreement.


How do you proofread for court reporters?

Court reporters send me a PDF of a deposition. I proofread the document and send an email to the court reporter listing any proposed changes by page number, line number, what currently exists there, and my suggestion.